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Frost Flower

Frost Flower: it’s not actually a flower, but dainty ribbons of ice crystals that form on some MO native plants. It can usually be seen late fall-early winter. When the ground is still warm and a hard freeze occurs, the plants’ stems are ruptured. The roots are still sending up water and nutrients from the...
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Cold Weather Does Not Equal Colorless Landscape

You CAN have year-round interest in your yard. Try planting some Ilex verticillata, Winterberry Holly. This deciduous shrub gives you sprays of bright red into the winter when most other plants are not flowering and are dormant. Winterberry Holly stands out best when put alongside other plants that turn a golden color when dormant, such...
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St. Louis Arch Grounds Project – Why the London Planetree?

I realize I am not the only one who is baffled by another large grouping of the exact same tree (monoculture) being used to replace the glorious ash trees on the St. Louis Arch Grounds. But after asking, “Why the same tree for 45% of the trees that cover the arch grounds?” the second question...
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Purple Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe involucrata)

Purple Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe involucrata) is the ideal plant for those looking for something with blooms throughout the majority of summer and into the fall. It thrives in drought and full sun and can be used in garden beds, cascading over walls, or even in planters. The magenta flowers are a favorite among many different...
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Indian Physic (Porteranthus stipulatus)

Indian Physic (Porteranthus stipulatus) – This compact, somewhat formal, plant gets to about 2-3 feet tall, and has white, star shaped flowers in early summer. Leaves are lighter green through summer and turn an attractive burnt red in the fall. Indian Physic will do well in a variety of conditions including dry or moist soils,...
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White Ash (Fraxinus americana)

Featuring: the White Ash tree (Fraxinus americana). The showy mix of fall color in this ash tree has appeared! A delightful combination of purples, reds, oranges, and yellows. This tree has given us so many things from tool handles to fuel. It also was used medicinally by Native Americans. Wildlife benefits: songbirds, bobwhite, wild turkey,...
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Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata)

I couldn’t put a plug out there for the Pignut Hickory fall color without also recognizing the Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata.) It’s a little ahead of the Pignut in terms of peak fall color. The main thing I’d like to highlight about this tree besides its color is one of its wildlife benefits. As you...
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Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra)

This week the fall color has really started to emerge in some of our native Missouri trees. One tree that is tough to pass up is the Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra.) Getting up to 80 feet tall, this tree is an upright stand of golden yellow beauty right now. It can be found in dryer...
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Vector Control & Mosquito Spraying

This post has less to do with strictly native plants and more to do with being informed about the impacts of insecticides on beneficial insects, including bees. More Native Plants = More Native Pollinators, especially bees. In my own yard, by the end of this summer, I counted up to 16+ native bee species, including...
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